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MonAug 15

Malaita Province Day – August 15, 2022

Malatia Province Day — also known as the Second Appointed Day — is celebrated annually on August 15 to commemorate the establishment of Malatia Province in the Solomon Islands. This is a public holiday where most citizens have the day off from work or school to enjoy the plentiful celebrations. After many centuries of colonization and brutality toward the people, Solomon Islanders show pride in their country and their culture by celebrating their independence. This is a very important holiday that has been observed since 1983. The locals celebrate by throwing parades, festivals, processions, sporting events, concerts, and speeches from politicians.

History of Malaita Province Day

The Solomon Islands is a country in Oceania made up of six major islands and over 900 small islands. The Solomon Islands contain nine provinces, the capital is Honiara and the largest and most populous province is Malatia Province. The islanders are mostly Melanesian with some Polynesians on the outer islands. Most of its people live in small rural villages and tight-knit communities. Familial ties are very important for them, with most people having 200 immediate family members and being able to trace their ancestry for ten generations.

Since 30,000 B.C., the Solomon Islands have been inhabited. In the Pleistocene era, they were originally occupied by Papuan communities. From 1568 through 1886, Europeans visited the islands, with the first being a Spanish navigator. Attempts to create long-term settlements were thwarted by the new diseases imported by the Europeans, which killed a large number of people. The islands began trading with the islanders after repeated visits from the United States, Britain, and Australia in the 18th century. The islanders’ interactions with foreign tourists were frequently violent. Europeans began kidnapped islanders in the 19th century to work as workers in Australia, Fiji, and Samoa. The majority of the islanders were slaves, with some earning pitiful salaries.

They were colonized by the British in 1893. The islanders began an emancipation movement from 1944 to 1952 known as Maasina Ruru. The British arrested and charged the leaders of the movement, but islanders fought back by refusing to pay taxes and barricading their villages against the British. Their needs were met in 1951 and they gained independence in 1978. The country changed its name from British Solomon Islands to the Solomon Islands.

Malaita Province Day timeline

30 000 B.C.
First Colonization

The Papuan settlement from New Guinea colonizes Solomon Islanders.

1568 — 1886 A.D.
Attempts Colonization

The Spanish and British attempt to colonize the Islanders but fail.

1840-1860s
Slave Labor

Islanders are either kidnapped or recruited to work as laborers in Australia, Fiji, and Samoa.

1893
British Colonization

The Solomon Islands are colonized by the British.

1978
Independence

The Solomon Islands become independent from the United Kingdom.

1983
Malatia Province Day

Malatia Province Day is founded as a public holiday.

Malaita Province Day FAQs

How many people live in Malatia?

Malatia has a population of 161,832 people.

What religion is practiced in the Solomon Islands?

The Solomon Islands are predominantly Christian with 76.6% being protestants and 19% being catholic.

What language is spoken in the Solomon Islands?

The official language in the Solomon Islands is English but only 1.2% can speak it fluently. There are over 80 languages spoken in the Solomon Islands, including Solomons Pijin.

How to Observe Malaita Province Day

  1. Join in the festivities

    The Solomon Islands hold many events and festivities during this day. Eat local food and dance to traditional music to show your pride!

  2. Host your own party

    If you live outside the islands but want to share in the pride, host your own party. Gather your friends and throw a party. Bring the islands to your home by watching videos of Solomon Islanders celebrating the day.

  3. Learn more about Solomon Islander

    If you’re not part of the culture but want to appreciate it, learn more about the islands and their culture. Consider going for a visit the next time you’re planning a trip.

5 Interesting Facts About The Solomon Islands

  1. Half of it remains uninhabited

    Most of the Solomon Islanders live on the six major islands.

  2. It’s named after King Solomon

    A Spanish explorer named the islands The Islands of Solomon thinking they hold great riches and that they were the source of King Solomon’s wealth.

  3. It has thriving wildlife

    90% of the islands are made up of rainforests with hundreds of species of plants and birds native to the islands and found nowhere else.

  4. They named an island after Kennedy

    John F. Kennedy and his crew were hit by a Japanese boat during WWII but were rescued by two islanders.

  5. They have no army

    The Solomon Islands are one of very few countries in the world not to have an army.

Why Malaita Province Day is Important

  1. It reminds us to be proud

    The Solomon Islands would not have gained their independence if they didn’t fight for their country and rebel against the British. This day reminds all the islanders how important it is to be proud of their history and accomplishments.

  2. It celebrates culture

    This is the day for the locals to celebrate their own culture after fighting against British rule. From local food, music, and dancing, the islanders are reminded to love and appreciate their own culture.

  3. It shows what a united country can accomplish

    Family is very important for Solomon Islanders. If they didn’t band together and form a united front, they would still be struggling to maintain their culture and traditions.

Malaita Province Day dates

YearDateDay
2022August 15Monday
2023August 15Tuesday
2024August 15Thursday
2025August 15Friday
2026August 15Saturday

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